Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page was allowed to prune a tree just weeks after Robbie Williams was turned down

Veteran rocker Jimmy Page was given permission to prune a tree in his garden – just seven weeks after his neighbor Robbie Williams was turned down for similar work.

The legendary Led Zeppelin guitarist and the former Take That frontman have been at odds for years over Williams’ plans to build a mega basement under his mansion.

MailOnline revealed in April that the Angels singer had lost a planning battle to drastically cut down an 80-foot-tall protected Robinia tree in his £17.5 million home.

But Page, 78, had better luck with council officials when he signed up to prune a massive laurel tree in the front yard of his own Grade One listed Gothic mansion in west London.

In contrast to his rival Williams, the Stairway to Heaven guitarist was given consent to ‘reduce and shape’ the ornamental tree’s crown by up to a meter.

Page had to apply for permission to do the work as his tree is subject to a Tree Preservation Order and his home is in a conservation area.

Singer Robbie Williams wanted to cut this large 70-foot tree off the front of his West London mansion, but it was banned. But now the Led Zeppelin guitarist has been given permission, fueling their long-term rivalry.

Robbie Williams, pictured, wanted to cut down the tree outside his home to three feet

Williams, pictured with his wife Ayda Field alongside Led Zeppelin guitarist

Robbie Williams, pictured with his wife Ayda Field, wanted to cut the tree outside their home to three feet, but was refused.

Williams claimed the tree is causing its wall to crack, putting it at risk of collapsing.  The board suggested that Mr.  Williams could rebuild the wall giving the tree more room to grow

Williams claimed the tree is causing its wall to crack, putting it at risk of collapsing. The board suggested that Mr. Williams could rebuild the wall giving the tree more room to grow

Officials from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea approved the project under their delegated powers after deciding it was simply ‘routine maintenance’.

Page’s agent who placed the order on his behalf confirmed in paperwork that the tree was not diseased and did not pose a subsidence risk to the property, drains or sidewalk.

Amanda Reid, the council’s director of Planning and Location, decided that the consent was valid for two years and was just a permit for ‘a pruning operation’.

She advised in her decision letter: ‘No work should take place on Sundays and noisy operations unless the essentials are avoided on Saturdays.’

Reid also stipulated that Page must still follow the rules of the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981, meaning he could not do anything that could damage a habitat for bats or birds, or their nests.

MailOnline revealed in April that the same board official had turned down Williams’ request to reduce the height of his giant Robinia tree to just one meter.

The singer argued that the tree was partially rotting and damaging his garden wall.

But the council refused permission to work on the protected tree, saying it had not provided evidence of the ‘extent of decomposition’.

Page did not raise any objections to the board to Williams’ plans for the tree. It was reported in March that he was really supportive of the request and appreciated that the tree needed trimming.

Likewise, Williams did not raise any objections to the board over the guitarist’s proposal to prune his laurel tree.

Reid, who approved Page’s tree pruning plan, decided that pruning Williams’ Robinia to a height of one meter would only allow it to grow back.

She argued that the singer could instead rebuild the garden wall to give the tree room to grow without causing further damage.

Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, pictured, was given permission to prune the tree as a 'one-time maintenance'

Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, pictured, was given permission to prune the tree as a ‘one-time maintenance’

Robbie Williams claimed that the deterioration was visible at the base of his tree, but he was still refused.  Page did not argue that his tree was sick, but he was still allowed to carry out 'routine maintenance' by the board.

Robbie Williams claimed that the deterioration was visible at the base of his tree, but he was still refused. Page did not argue that his tree was sick, but he was still allowed to carry out ‘routine maintenance’ by the board.

Williams claimed in his application that the decomposition was ‘visible at the base of the tree’ and was causing its ‘border wall to crack’.

He also argued that some of this was ‘touching the adjacent street lamp’ outside of his property.

But Mrs. Reid decided: ‘If there is deterioration at the base of the tree, this extent of deterioration needs to be quantified before removal of this high amenity TPO’d tree can be considered.

“If the tree is causing the wall to crack, this problem will not be fixed by cutting the tree to a height of one meter as the tree will regenerate.

‘Also, the wall could probably be rebuilt to allow the tree to grow in the future without further damage.’

She offered a glimmer of hope for Williams, saying the board would ‘definitely grant permission’ to cut the tree’s canopy to prevent it from interfering with adjacent street lighting.

Mrs. Reid wrote: ‘Growing foliage against street furniture does not require the removal of a tree.’

Williams moved in next door to Page in 2013 and went on to harass the heavy rocker, drawing up plans to build an ‘iceberg basement’ with an indoor pool, gym and underpass to the main house.

The feud continued for five years until October 2019, when Williams was finally given planning permission to do the work on his star-listed high school home.

MailOnline revealed in April that the Angels singer had lost a planning battle to drastically cut down an 80-foot-tall protected Robinia tree in his £17.5 million home.

MailOnline revealed in April that the Angels singer had lost a planning battle to drastically cut down an 80-foot-tall protected Robinia tree in his £17.5 million home.

Page vehemently disputed the request, saying that even the slightest of vibrations could affect his own Grade One listed home and damage its fragile old paintings and frescoes.

The guitarist won a concession that meant the singer’s builders could only use hand tools to excavate the basement, which would mean it would take years at great expense.

Page also objected to plans for a music studio and summer terrace at the Williams home.

Williams was thought to have lost interest in his basement construction project and was reportedly looking to sell his London property after moving to Switzerland during the Covid pandemic.

But he recently appeared to revive it, offering assurances that the new air conditioners for his pool would not exceed 25 decibels, which is less than the sound of a person whispering.

Led Zeppelin were once ironically known as one of the loudest heavy metal bands in the world, with performances of their ‘Whole Lotta Love’ reaching 130 decibels at concerts in 1970 – one of the highest levels ever recorded at public events.

The noise-sensitive Page also complained in April 2019 about a request by another neighbor, insurance mogul and former Prudential chairman Sir Harvey McGrath, to build four air conditioning units in his £12.8m mansion, but the guitarist lost that battle.

Page did not raise any objections to the board to Williams' plans for the tree.  It was reported in March that he really supported the request and appreciated that the tree needed trimming.

Page did not raise any objections to the board to Williams’ plans for the tree. It was reported in March that he really supported the request and appreciated that the tree needed trimming.

The guitarist won a concession that meant the singer's builders could only use hand tools to excavate the basement, which would take years at great expense.

The guitarist won a concession that meant the singer’s builders could only use hand tools to excavate the basement, which would mean it would take years at great expense.

A new report from Williams’ sound experts Nova Acoustics revealed that he would have to take further steps to reduce the sound of his units by as much as 8dBs to meet the required ‘whisper’ level of 25dBs.

Before any construction begins, his team also promised to produce a construction traffic management plan, which includes the ‘routing of demolition, excavation and construction vehicles, and site access arrangements.

It will also cover ‘the number and type of vehicles per day/week, details of any diversion or other disruption to the public road, and details of measures to protect pedestrians and other road users’.

Williams, who bought his London home from the family of the late director and restaurant critic Michael Winner, has reportedly rented it out to restaurateur The Ivy Richard Caring since moving into a new luxury mansion in Zurich.

Last September, he appeared to be wrapping up Page by putting a poster reading ‘Let me evacuate you’ on the wall of a £6.75m mansion he was selling in Compton Bassett, Wiltshire.

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